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2014 California Intertidal Ecology Survey Final Discussion and Conclusions

2014 California Intertidal Ecology Survey
Final Discussion and Conclusions
James landers, January 28, 2015

Survey Links
Statement of Purpose (link)
Final Discussion and Conclusions (link)
Report Links
White Rock      Monterey Bay    Fitzgerald
Bodega Bay      Gerstle Cove      MacKerricher
Field Data Sheets
White Rock      Monterey Bay    Fitzgerald
Bodega Bay      Gerstle Cove      MacKerricher

Other Links
Specimens posted to iNaturalist
and Project Noah (link)

Weeds in the Intertidal Garden (link)
Unidentified Rockweed (link)

Abstract. Observations and data for all six sites surveyed are compared in this final summation. Some findings from individual surveys already posted are repeated here; more findings from other research have been added in order to place our experience in a broader context and contrast our data with that of the long-term monitoring projects of UC Santa Cruz and the California Department of Fish and Wildlife. Our early consideration of issues such as zonation, alga growth, or species diversity in the California Intertidal zone has matured over the course of our surveys and led to an improved understanding of the value of long-term observation of the dynamic and highly diversified ecological environment of the intertidal zone as a component of a complex ocean system crucial to the health of our planet. Continue reading 2014 California Intertidal Ecology Survey Final Discussion and Conclusions

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Gerstle Cove Marine Reserve Survey Report, May 16, 2014

2014 Intertidal Ecology Survey
Gerstle Cove Marine Reserve, Salt Point State Park CA
Field Survey Report
James Landers, May 16, 2014 (Rev. November 28, 2014)

Abstract. Gerstle Cove State Marine Reserve is located within the boundary of Salt Point State Park, seven miles north of Fort Ross CA, and is part of the Salt Point State Marine Conservation Area. Gerstle is a small protected cove facing open coast. Public access is through Salt Point State Park. The survey site in the cove is frequented by divers, park visitors, and harbor seals.

Purple shore crabs (Hemigrapsus nudus) are plentiful along the higher margin of the rock-littered beach, acorn barnacles (Balanus and Chthamalus) are abundant in a few small crevices, and barnacles and limpets (Lottia) are sparsely distributed over middle to higher zone rocks. No mussels (Mytilus californianus), sea stars (excepting one bat star, Asterina miniata) or sea urchins were observed. Endocladia muricata is present in small amounts, and Petrocelis is common, however two unidentified rockweeds are the prominent cover in middle zones of the intertidal and occupy much open space. Marine herbivores ̶ limpets, littorines, and chitons ̶ seemed low in proportion to the amount of these unidentified rockweeds. Continue reading Gerstle Cove Marine Reserve Survey Report, May 16, 2014

Monterey Bay NMS Survey Report, April 4, 2014

2014 Intertidal Ecology Survey
Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary, Pacific Grove CA
Field Survey Report
James Landers, April 4, 2014 (Rev. November 26, 2014)

Abstract. Like the previous survey in this series, at the Cambria CA White Rock SMCA, a survey plot in the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary at Pacific Grove CA also exhibits less diversity than might be expected of the rocky intertidal along the Pacific coast, however the middle and lower intertidal zones are less dominated by tar spot algae (Petrocelis), stunted Turkish towel (Mastocarpus papillatus) and black turban snails (Tegula funebralis). The circumstances at this location of barnacles, and Endocladia, raise questions about how settlement is accomplished in high, dry conditions, and on top of broad patches of Endocladia that deplete open space. Continue reading Monterey Bay NMS Survey Report, April 4, 2014

White Rock SMCA Survey Report, March 13, 2014

2014 Intertidal Ecology Survey
White Rock State Marine Conservation Area (SMCA)
Field Survey Report
James Landers, March 13, 2014
(Revised November 26, 2014)

Abstract. A small survey plot in the White Rock State Marine Conservation Area at Cambria, California, exhibits less diversity than might be expected of the rocky intertidal along the Pacific coast. The middle and lower intertidal zones are dominated by Brillo Pad algae (Endocladia muricata), stunted Turkish towel (Mastocarpus papillatus) and black turban snails (Tegula funebralis), and about half the rock surface in those zones is encrusted with tar spot algae (Petrocelis). Moreover, animals common in the intertidal of immediately surrounding areas are not found at the location surveyed. Continue reading White Rock SMCA Survey Report, March 13, 2014